Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Saturday, October 26, 2019

Quick Guide To Industry Acronyms

 Quick Guide To Industry Acronyms


Understanding the many industry acronyms and terms can be overwhelming. This quick guide can get you up to speed on some of the most important terms and meanings.

GVW – Gross Vehicle Weight
This is the total weight of the truck, including all passengers, drivers, cargo, accessories, fuel, and fluid in the engine at any point in time. It is important that this measurement does not go over the GVWR, or it can be a safety hazard.

GVWR – Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
This is the maximum total vehicle weight that is safe for the truck, established by the chassis manufacturer. The weight of the truck, any cargo, and passengers including the driver, as well as any fuel and fluid in the engine is included in the rating. Chassis manufacturers will most often set the GVWR lower than the combined axle ratings (the total amount of weight an individual axle can carry). This is due to the chassis manufacturer’s internal safety standards for durability, stability, and handling, as well as SAE International test protocols.

GCWR – Gross Combined Weight Rating
Everything that moves with the vehicle is included in the GCWR. The weight of the truck, any cargo, passengers including the driver, any fluid or fuel in the truck, as well as the weight of the trailer and the trailer’s cargo is included. Exceeding the GCWR can cause a safety hazard.

Payload
The cargo carrying capacity of a vehicle is the payload. It is calculated by subtracting the vehicles’ weight including passengers and the driver from the GVWR. Exceeding the Payload capacity can cause damage to your suspension, chassis, frame, tires, and many other parts of the truck.

CA – Cab to Axle
The cab-to-axle measurement is the distance from the back of the truck cab to the center of the rear axle. Clear CA or effective CA is the distance from the rear surface of any obstruction behind the cab to the center of the rear axle. If you have a tandem axle truck, then it is measured to the midpoint between the two rear axles. This measurement can help you determine the length of the body that can be mounted on the chassis.

Wheelbase
The wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear axles. When the truck has more than two axels, it is the distance between the steering axle and the center point of the driving axle group. This can affect body installation, weight distribution, and truck performance.

SRW – Single Rear Wheel
A single rear wheel refers to a chassis that has one wheel on each side of the rear axle. Single Rear wheels make for smoother driving without cargo, as well as easier driving in cities, suburbs, and highways. These trucks are more affordable to purchase outright, and have better fuel economy. A single rear wheel has less towing capability than a dual rear wheel, and less stability when towing in windy conditions.

DRW – Dual Rear Wheel
A dual rear wheel refers to a chassis that has two wheels on each side of the rear axle. This feature is a must if you are towing large payloads, or driving through rough terrain. It adds stability to your truck which increases safety for your divers and cargo. Having a dual rear wheel will allow the driver to safely get off the road in the case of a tire blowing out. Trucks with a dual rear wheel can be difficult to maneuver in cities, where parking and tight streets can be challenging. This feature can also reduce the truck’s mpg, especially in cities, and increase maintenance costs, because there are at least two extra tires to replace or rotate.

CDL – Commercial Driver’s License
The vehicle’s GVWR is one of the factors that will effect whether the diver needs a CDL. If the truck has a GVWR, and GVW of 26,000 lbs. or lower, the driver does not need a CDL.

Class A
A Class A license is required to operate any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 lbs. or more. This includes towing a trailer weighing over 10,000 lbs. which makes the vehicle and trailer rating over 26,001 lbs.

Class B
A Class B license is required to operate a single vehicle with a GVWR or 26,001 lbs. or more, and/or a vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs. or heavier that is towing another vehicle weighting up to 10,000 lbs.

Class C
A Class C license is required if the vehicle you intend to drive does not meet the criteria for either Class A or B and it is meant to transport either: 16 or more passengers including the driver or hazardous material.

Original Source: NTEA Truck Equipment Glossary


Blog Source: https://www.knapheide.com/news/blog/2018/08/quick-guide-to-industry-acronyms

Sunday, October 20, 2019

Venco Venturo Company Showcase Video


Venco Venturo Industries LLC has created a specialized line of high-caliber cranes and hoists for over 50 years and is known throughout the industry as one of the founding members of the NTEA. Our products are rugged, reliable, made in America, and built to last. Venco Venturo’s quality craftsmanship is backed by straight talk, real expertise, and superior customer service. We offer cranes and hoists for building supply, construction, public works, mining, railroad, oil/gas, propane markets and much more. Venco Venturo promises you:

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Kargo Master Van Equipment


Kargo Master offers wide varieties of van equipment, van shelving, and other van storage systems. Visit KargoMaster.com for more information

Monday, October 14, 2019

Ranch Hand Bumper Factory Tour! MAKING A BEAST!



My Channel is primarily focused on Full Size pickup reviews as well as trucking equipment.Thank you for watching my channel. Please subscribe if you like my content and post comments below. I enjoy making these videos, but couldn't (and wouldn't) do it without an audience. I would like to thank my sponsor, Ranch Hand Bumpers, for their amazing support of my channel.

Please visit www.Ranchhand.com


By Big Truck Big RV

Friday, October 11, 2019

Kargo King Roll Off Rental Deck With Adjustable Hitch - Enoven Truck Body



Sam with Enoven Truck Body shows off the custom built equipment transportation body from Kargo King. This body will safely load equipment at the ground level eliminating the chance of injury and the hazards of using a traditional roll back. It also has a hydraulic adjustable hitch so you can tow a trailer once your equipment is loaded. See more at http://www.enoven.com.

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

FordPass™: Built To Keep You Moving | FordPass | Ford


With FordPass,™ rewards are just a tap away. It’s the only app that puts maintenance, rewards, roadside assistance and connectivity in the palm of your hand.*

*Based on U.S. auto manufacturer owner’s mobile apps only. FordPass Connect is an optional feature on select vehicles and is required for certain remote features. Service includes 1-year trial for remote features, excluding Wi-Fi hotspot, that starts with vehicle sales date (after which, fees apply). Connected service and related feature functionality is subject to compatible AT&T-network availability. Evolving technology/cellular networks may affect functionality and availability, or continued provision of some features, prohibiting them from functioning. Certain restrictions, 3rd-party terms or message/data rates may apply.

Saturday, October 5, 2019

Rightsizing Your Vehicle Fleet to Conserve Fuel

Fleet rightsizing is a management practice that can help vehicle fleet managers build and maintain sustainable, fuel-efficient fleets. Fleet inventories often grow over time to include vehicles that are highly specialized, rarely used, or unsuitable for current applications. By evaluating fleet size and composition, managers can optimize vehicle use, conserve fuel, reduce emissions, and save money on fuel and maintenance.

Evaluate Vehicle Needs and Use
Fleet managers should understand their fleet's daily vehicle use and needs. Most fleet managers already have a handle on their number and type of vehicles, average mileage, payloads, and fuel economy. Fleet rightsizing combines this information with a critical look at fleet operations to identify opportunities to reduce energy use. When rightsizing, fleet managers should evaluate how important each vehicle is to the fleet’s performance by asking themselves:

What tasks are accomplished by each vehicle? Or, what is the drive cycle?

What is the daily, weekly, or monthly mileage of each vehicle? Or, what is the duty cycle?

Are fleet vehicles the optimal vehicle type, class, and size for the job?

Are there any vehicles that are no longer cost effective to operate or are no longer fulfilling their purpose?

Are there any vehicles that are no longer being used or have experienced a lot of downtime?

What is the fuel consumption of each vehicle? Can any vehicles be replaced by lighter, more fuel-efficient vehicles?

What is the age of the vehicles? Can any vehicles be replaced by newer, more efficient and reliable vehicles?

Are there any alternatives to owning or leasing a vehicle, such as shuttle bus services, motor pool vehicles, sharing vehicles with other offices/agencies, vehicle stipends, public transportation, or short-term rentals when needed?

Considering the answers to the previous questions, what is the optimal composition of the fleet required to properly support the fleet’s needs?

In addition to reviewing telematics or fleet analysis data, fleet managers should consider soliciting input from drivers when conducting a rightsizing review, as they can be very knowledgeable about how vehicles are being used to support operations. Gathering this input also gives drivers a stake in the development of rightsizing recommendations. Fleet managers can solicit input through driver surveys or face-to-face meetings to establish consensus.

A fleet rightsizing strategy should evaluate the business case of each vehicle to determine whether reassigning, replacing, or eliminating the vehicle would reduce fuel and maintenance costs without compromising fleet activities. Fleet managers often need to define evaluation criteria and rank vehicles to complete this analysis. A fleet dominated by sport utility vehicles, for example, may find that mid-size sedans can suffice with a significant reduction in fuel costs.

Fleet managers may develop their own analysis or use existing evaluation tools. The Vehicle Allocation Methodology developed by the U.S. General Services Administration is an evaluation framework that federal agency fleets use to ensure fleets are cost-effective and contain the appropriate number and type of vehicles. Learn more about this methodology in the Comprehensive Federal Fleet Management Handbook (PDF).

Make Smart Vehicle Purchases

Fleet managers may decide to replace older vehicles with more fuel-efficient or alternative fuel vehicles. These purchasing strategies may help fleet managers make decisions that meet operational needs and conserve fuel:

Transition to Smaller, More Efficient Engines: Using smaller engines can help fleets meet operational needs without downgrading vehicle class. Some fleets choose to switch from 6-cylinder to 4-cylinder engines to help reduce fuel use and emissions. In many cases, the new, smaller engine can have nearly the same horsepower as a larger engine. Fleet managers can also improve fuel efficiency by selecting smaller engines with optional gearing for their application.

Choose Lighter Vehicles: When purchasing new vehicles, look for opportunities to reduce vehicle weight. Lightweight materials, such as aluminum frames, and smaller components can reduce rolling resistance and drag, thereby improving a vehicle’s fuel economy. For example, a 10% reduction in vehicle weight can improve fuel economy by 6% to 8%. Also, try to avoid unnecessarily large body configurations and heavy accessories. For more information, refer to the North American Council for Freight Efficiency's Confidence Report.

Use Alternative Fuels and Vehicles: Alternative fuel and fuel-efficient advanced vehicles can reduce a fleet's fuel use, making them economical options for many fleets. Cost savings from vehicle maintenance, operation, and fuel use and price often offset higher purchase prices.

Source: https://afdc.energy.gov/conserve/rightsizing.html

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Advanced Clean Transportation Expo -2020


CONFERENCE MAY 11-14, 2020 EXPO MAY 12-13, 2020

LONG BEACH CONVENTION CENTER LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA


BE AT THE FOREFRONT OF  THE MEGA TRENDS DRIVING THE FUTURE OF THE INDUSTRY—CONNECTED TECHNOLOGIES, EFFICIENCY, ELECTRIFICATION, ALTERNATIVE FUELS, SUSTAINABILITY, AND MORE.


Learn more at:  https://www.actexpo.com/